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Laurence Yep

Laurence Yep(1948- )
Laurence Yep is the critically acclaimed author of more than sixty books for children and young adults, including two Newbery Honor Award winners: Dragonwings and Dragon’s Gate. In 2005, he won the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. Yep lives with his wife in California.

City Trilogy

City Trilogy — (2009-2013) Ages 9-12. Publisher: Two-time Newbery Honor Award-winning author Laurence Yep kicks off an action-packed new fantasy trilogy. Sure to appeal to fans of Rick Riordan and Eoin Colfer, this action-packed tale takes readers on an unforgettable journey through an alternate version of our world in 1941 — a world filled with magical beings such as dragons in human form, tiny ‘lap griffins,’ reincarnations of legendary Chinese warriors, Japanese folk creatures, and goddesses in disguise. When her older sister dies trying to prevent the theft of one of her people’s great treasures, twelve-year-old Scirye sets out to avenge her and recover the precious item. Helping her are Bayang, a dragon disguised as a Pinkerton agent; Leech, a boy with powers he has not yet discovered; and Leech’s loyal companion Koko, who has a secret of his own. All have a grudge against the thieves who stole the treasure: the evil dragon Badik and the mysterious Mr. Roland. Scirye and her companions pursue the thieves to Houlani, a new Hawaiian island being created by magic. There, they befriend Pele, the volatile and mercurial goddess of volcanoes. But even with Pele on their side, they may not be able to stop Mr. Roland from gaining what he seeks: the Five Lost Treasures of Emperor Yu. Together, the treasures will give him the power to alter the very fabric of the universe.

children's fantasy book review Laurence Yep City Trilogy 1. City of Fire 2. City of Icechildren's fantasy book review Laurence Yep City Trilogy 1. City of Fire 2. City of Icefantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews

City of Fire: A bit thin, even for youngsters

Readers’ average rating:

City of Fire by Laurence Yep

City of Fire is the opening book in a new YA fantasy trilogy by Laurence Yep, set in an alternate version of 1941 where humans and magical creatures (trolls, lap griffins, shapeshifters, dragons, etc.) freely intermingle and society employs a mix of magic and technology. The novel opens in San Francisco with a tense and mysterious pov, as the assassin narrator Bayang observes her target — a young boy named Leech who somehow poses a threat to Bayang’s “people” and who has yet to come into his “true power.” The scene then shifts to another pov, this time 12-yr-old Scirye, who — along with her mother the consulate, her sister the elite guardswoman, and her lap griffin — is in attendance at the museum opening of an exhibit of the greatest treasures of her culture (the Kushian empire). It quickly becomes clear that Sciry... Read More

More fantasy by Laurence Yep

Dragons of the Sea — (1982-1992) Ages 9-12. Publisher: The outlawed princess of the Dragon Clan and her young human companion undergo fearsome trials in their quest for an evil enchantress. Dramatic tension stays high. Weaves Chinese legend into an exciting tapestry of myth and folklore.

children's fantasy Laurence Yep Dragons of the Sea 1. Dragon of the Lost Sea 2. Dragon Steel 3. Dragon Cauldron 4. Dragon Warchildren's fantasy Laurence Yep Dragons of the Sea 1. Dragon of the Lost Sea 2. Dragon Steel 3. Dragon Cauldron 4. Dragon Warchildren's fantasy Laurence Yep Dragons of the Sea 1. Dragon of the Lost Sea 2. Dragon Steel 3. Dragon Cauldron 4. Dragon Warchildren's fantasy Laurence Yep Dragons of the Sea 1. Dragon of the Lost Sea 2. Dragon Steel 3. Dragon Cauldron 4. Dragon War


Tiger’s Apprentice — (2003-2006) Ages 9-12. Publisher: It isn’t every day you meet a tiger. And certainly not a tiger in a suit and tie. And definitely not one who knows your first name. From that minute on, Tom’s life changes forever. Tom has always felt different from everyone else, but he has no idea how different he really is until he learns that he is the latest in a long line of magic-wielding beings called Guardians. For centuries, a Guardian has protected a powerful talisman that can either bring peace to the world or bring about its destruction. it has been kept safe — until now. For now, the most evil being of all has sent his terrifying minions to lay siege to the talisman and its latest Guardian, a tiger called Mr. Hu. The Guardian has his own allies in the battle, including an outlaw dragon, a mischievous monkey, and his new apprentice — Tom. But Tom doesn’t want to be the tiger’s apprentice. What can he possibly do to help this ragtag band? And can they all stop bickering long enough to unite their powers in time? This rich, action-packed fantasy from two-time Newbery Honor author Laurence Yep reveals a hidden world within our own-where animals take human form, where friendship is the final weapon in the battle between good and evil, and where a young boy must save the world he knows… and the one he is just discovering.

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Stand-alones:

fantasy and science fiction book reviewsSweetwater — (1973) Ages 9-12. Publisher: On the planet Harmony, Tyree and his people are fighting to survive. Their beautiful world holds terrible dangers — vicious sea creatures, diminishing food supplies, and, at the heart of it all, a rising tide that will soon destroy the city where they cling to their way of life. Tyree has secretly befriended Amadeus, the greatest songmaster of the native alien race. Amadeus teaches Tyree about the power of music, and, to Tyree’s blind sister, he gives an awesome treasure. But his gift kindles the fears of Tyree’s people — fears more dangerous than the sea itself. Tyree must help his people before they tear their community apart. In this richly inventive science-fiction novel, acclaimed children’s author Laurence Yep creates a future world that is as haunting and as powerful as the song that Tyree learns to playLaurence Yep Seademons


Seademons — (1977) Ages 9-12.


Laurence Yep Monster Makers, IncMonster Makers Inc — (1986) Ages 9-12. Publisher’s Weekly: Godzilla makes an unruly pet, as teenage Piper Kincaid learns when his geneticist father hatches a monster a foot high to prove it’s possible. (On the command, ”Tokyo,” the little beast breathes fire.) Even so, Dr. Kincaid’s fledgling business on the planet Carefree is foundering through bad luck and the tendency of his little creatures to get loose and wreak havoc at nearby resort hotels. One such ecapade introduces Piper to spoiled but personable Shandi Tyr, whose tycoon father may be the financial angel the Kincaids need. First, though, they learn that their bad luck was contrived by alien Xylk beings, who were worried that the scientist would see through their own genetic engineering, a key element of their plan of invasion. This is a lively young adult novel, but its marketing as an adult book creates expectations it was not meant to fulfill.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Curse of the Squirrel — (1987) Ages 9-12. Publisher: From the time a giant squirrel curses Farmer Johnson’s best hunting dog, things are never the same around the farm, and hunting little animals ceases to be a sport.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Ghost Fox — (1994) Ages 9-12. Publisher: While his father is away from their Chinese village, Little Lee fights to save his mother’s soul from an evil fox creature that has assumed human form.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Imp That Ate My Homework — (1997) Ages 9-12. Publisher: Showdown in Chinatown! Jim wants to be a normal American kid. The only problem: His grandfather is the meanest, ugliest man in Chinatown. Grandpop has no patience for his “native born, no brains” grandson, and Jim is not all that interested in hearing about old Chinese customs and superstitions. But then a nasty green imp shows up, determined to settle an ancient family feud. The imp is making Jim’s life miserable, and Grandpop seems to be the only one who can help. Could Grandpop really be the reincarnation of an ancient Chinese warrior– the world’s only hope against one mean gree imp? Two-time Newbery Honor author Laurence Yep interweaves fantasy, humor, and a celebration of family into this entertaining tale. 2000 Georgia Children’s Book Award and 01-02 Land of Enchantment Book Award Masterlist (Gr. 3-6)Two-time Newbery Honor author Laurence Yep interweaves fantasy, humor, and a celebration of family into this entertaining tale.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Magic Paintbrush — (2000) Ages 9-12. Publisher: Steve can hardly believe it. With his new paintbrush, whatever he paints becomes real. Now he, Grandfather, and Uncle Fong can wish for anything they want. Uncle Fong uses the paintbrush to return to China, to the village of his childhood, and Grandfather wants to visit the Lady on the Moon. Steve wonders if the paintbrush can bring his parents back. But they all soon realize the paintbrush might have its own agenda.


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