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Ken Scholes

Ken Scholes(1968- )
Ken Scholes‘ short fiction has appeared in various magazines and anthologies including Realms of Fantasy, Polyphony 6, Weird Tales and his first collection, Long Walks, Last Flights and Other Journeys (Fairwood Press). Ken Scholes also has a degree in history and was a winner of the Writers of the Future contest.
Read or listen to some of his short stories at Ken Scholes’ website.

CLICK HERE FOR A FEW MORE TITLES BY KEN SCHOLES.

The Psalms of Isaak

The Psalms of Isaak — (2009-2013) Publisher: An ancient weapon has completely destroyed the city of Windwir. From many miles away, Rudolfo, Lord of the Nine Forest Houses, sees the horrifying column of smoke rising. He knows that war is coming to the Named Lands. Nearer to the Devastation, a young apprentice is the only survivor of the city — he sat waiting for his father outside the walls, and was transformed as he watched everyone he knew die in an instant. Soon all the Kingdoms of the Named Lands will be at each others’ throats, as alliances are challenged and hidden plots are uncovered. This remarkable first novel from an award-winning short fiction writer will take readers away to a new world — an Earth so far in the distant future that our time is not even a memory; a world where magick is commonplace and great areas of the planet are impassable wastes. But human nature hasn’t changed through the ages: War and faith and love still move princes and nations.

fantasy book reviews Ken Scholes Psalms of Isaak 1. Lamentation 2. Canticlefantasy book reviews Ken Scholes Psalms of Isaak 1. Lamentation 2. Canticle 3. Antiphonfantasy book reviews Ken Scholes Psalms of Isaak 1. Lamentation 2. Canticle 3. Antiphonfantasy and science fiction book reviews

Lamentation: A rich story, beautifully told

Readers’ average rating:

Lamentation by Ken Scholes

Lamentation is a promising start to a new fantasy (or at least semi-fantasy) series, which is a bit ironic as its own start is a bit bumpy. The story begins with a bang — literally. We're witness to the utter destruction of an entire city — screams, flames, toppling buildings, searing winds, etc. Many novels would end with the scene, but Ken Scholes chooses to make it the starting point of the plot, an original beginning which I liked a lot.

Unfortunately, Scholes seemed to like it a lot as well and so he gave us the same basic scene — the city's destruction — from one viewpoint, then another, then another, then another. Not the details themselves, but the immediate aftermath. At first, I thought it a nice touch — a relatively innovative way to introduce more than a single main character. But the repetition grew a bit annoyin... Read More

Canticle: Rising intensity

Readers’ average rating:

Canticle by Ken Scholes

Canticle, the follow-up to Ken ScholesLamentation, shares some of the same flaws and strengths as the first novel, including a rough start, but like its predecessor overcomes its flaws to turn into an engrossing, if not action-packed, novel.

Canticle picks up a few months after the events of Lamentation. It’s Scholes’ concerted effort to recap those events that makes the opening somewhat flawed, as much of the exposition feels forced and awkwardly inserted. I think he would have been better served with a simple prologue recap, rather than filtering the events through the conveniently-placed reminiscences of his characters. Luckily, the clumsiness only lasts for a few dozen pages before Scholes deems us sufficiently caught up and lets us ... Read More

Antiphon: Even better than its predecessors

Readers’ average rating:

Antiphon by Ken Scholes

PLOT SUMMARY: The ancient past is not dead. The hand of the Wizard Kings still reaches out to challenge the Androfrancine Order, to control the magick and technology that they sought to understand and claim for their own.

Nebios, the boy who watched the destruction of the city of Windwir, now runs the vast deserts of the world, far from his beloved Marsh Queen. He is being hunted by strange women warriors, while his dreams are invaded by warnings from his dead father.

Jin Li Tam, queen of the Ninefold Forest, guards her son as best she can against both murderous threats, and the usurper queen and her evangelists. They bring a message: Jakob is the child of promise of their Gospel, and the Crimson Empress is on her way.

And in hidden places, the remnants of the Androfrancine order formulate their response to the song pouring out of a s... Read More

Requiem: Moves the story along but in weaker fashion

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Requiem by Ken Scholes

Requiem is the fourth book in Ken Scholes PSALMS OF ISAAK series, which while having a few minor issues throughout has mostly been a fresh mix of fantasy and science fiction, filled with intriguing characters and exploring complex issues involving the intersection of religion, technology, and society. Requiem continues that exploration, though in weaker fashion than the prior three novels.

By now, the plot has grown extremely complicated, so I’m not going to offer up much of a plot recap, which should probably clue you in that this is a series that requires reading the books in order. While earlier books had many of the main characters together or at least paired up, in Requiem, Scholes has chosen to separate them, sending several all the way to the moon (and separating even the ones there).

The Gypsy King, Rud... Read More

FanLit Asks… About Style (Part 2)

Here's another installment of FanLit Asks. Instead of asking one author several questions, we’ve asked several authors just one question. Please leave a comment or suggest a question for us to ask in the future. We’ll choose one commenter to win a copy of Jack Vance's The Eyes of the Overworld (one of my favorites!) on audio CDs (or, if you've got bad taste, something else from our stacks).

Question: Which speculative fiction writer has had the greatest influence on your own writing style and what, specifically, do you find most inspirational about that writer’s style?

Alex Bell: Definitely Terry Pratchett... Read More

FanLit Asks: October 2, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:
Got any news to share?
Steven R. Boyett: I'm excited that I will be reading at the opening weekend of San Francisco's massive Litquake festival, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2-3 PM. I usually record these things, so it will be on the media page of my blog soon afterward. In my mortal guise I'm also a semi-famous DJ, and I'm also hugely stoked that I'll be DJing the Litquake/Litcrawl closing party at  Read More

FanLit Asks: October 16, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:


Got any news to share?
 
Stephen Deas: The Black Mausoleum came out in August and The King's Assassin will hit the shelves in a couple of days.

Bradley Beaulieu: I'm headed to the World Fantasy Convention in Toronto, Canada at the end of this month. I'll be doing a reading there, and there's also the mass autograph signing, so if anyone happens to be there, please stop by and say hello. I'd love to see you.



Laura Bickle: My first YA novel, The Hallowed Ones, was r... Read More

FanLit Asks: November 20, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:
Got any news to share?
Ken Scholes: I do... I recently turned in Requiem, volume 4 of the PSALMS OF ISAAK, and it will be out from Tor Books in June 2013.  And I've just recently taken the plunge to become a full time writer.

Pati Nagle: This summer my first mystery novel was published! Written under the pen name Patrice Greenwood, it's set in a tearoom in Santa Fe so it combines two of my great loves, tea and New Mexico. A Fatal Twist Of Lemon is available in print and as an ebook from Evennight Books and Book V... Read More