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Brenda Clough

Brenda Clough(1955- )
Brenda W. Clough spent much of her childhood overseas, courtesy of the U.S. government. She has lived in Laos, the Philippines, Hong Kong, and Germany. She earned a degree in English/Creative Writing at Carnegie Mellon University in 1977. Locus Magazine said of her work “Clough brings myth and science and plain human existence (complex as all get-out) together for what proves to be a fine blend, and a very good read, offering physical, psychological, and metaphysical insights into the human condition, along with the sometimes delightfully outlandish action that drives the best of pulp fiction.” The New York Times Book Review says, “Ms. Clough has an appealingly cheeky imagination.” Learn more at Brenda Clough’s website.

Averidan

Averidan — (1984-1988) Publisher: A Crown With a Mind of its Own… When Liras-ven Tsormelezok set off into his garden that morning, he knew he could claim some sort of royal ancestry-but then, so could most of the rest of the population of Averidan. Therefore, being named King while pruning his klimflower vines was a trifle unexpected. But that was only the first of the surprises waiting for Liras. For example, he discovered that the Crystal Crown of the Kings of Averidan could not only speak to him-it could kill him, if it decided he shouldn’t be king. And then were certain other inheritances from the late king: a war about which he knew nothing, and a royal bride-to-be with whom he could not speak. No wonder Liras decided to make a run for it…

Brenda Clough Averidan 1. The Crystal Crown 2. The Dragon of Mishbil 3. The Realm Beneath 4. The Name of the SunBrenda Clough Averidan 1. The Crystal Crown 2. The Dragon of Mishbil 3. The Realm Beneath 4. The Name of the SunBrenda Clough Averidan 1. The Crystal Crown 2. The Dragon of Mishbil 3. The Realm Beneath 4. The Name of the SunBrenda Clough Averidan 1. The Crystal Crown 2. The Dragon of Mishbil 3. The Realm Beneath 4. The Name of the Sun

The Crystal Crown: The components are good, but…

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The Crystal Crown by Brenda Clough

The Crystal Crown is basically a simple story. Liras-Ven, an unassuming and softspoken gardener, is chosen to be his nation’s next king, much to his horror. He makes a few bumbling attempts to extricate himself from the situation before settling down to endure a comical succession of royal duties and a military campaign that will test his resolve as leader as well as his ties to those he holds… he h….*snore*

Huh? What? Oh… right, yes. Anyway, The Crystal Crown measures in at about 230 pages in a pocket-size paperback, so it’s hardly a doorstopper, yet I must say I found it incredibly difficult to work my way through it. Having said that, most of the components that make up this novel are actually quite good. Clough’s prose is very deft, her sense of humor is charming, and t... Read More

Suburban Gods

Suburban Gods — (1997,2000) Urban fantasy/science fiction. Publisher: What is it like to have absolute power? You’d be Superman, right? Righting wrongs, making people happy, bringing peace and justice to the world? That’s what Washington, D.C., computer programmer Rob Lewis thinks when he wakes up one morning to discover that he can read minds — and change them. He can cure steam-grate crazies and make law-abiding citizens out of criminals. But he can’t control his own darker side. Terrified that he will destroy the way of life he so cherishes, he runs away from his wife and his family and his comfortable suburban home to the streets of New York City. Now a homeless derelict, he survives by his power alone, isolated from other human beings and his own humanity, a moral and physical wreck. But just as he hits bottom, he meets Dr. Edwin Amadeus Barbarossa, a cheerful neurobiologist at the National Institute of Mental Health. Together they set out on an exciting and painful quest for a desert in Uzbekistan, where at last Rob finds the answer to all the questions that have been tormenting him: What am I? Am I a god or a monster? Who has done this to me?

Deborah Clough Suburban Gods review 1. How Like a God 2. The Doors of Death and Lifefantasy book reviews science fiction book reviewsDeborah Clough Suburban Gods review 1. How Like a God 2. The Doors of Death and Lifefantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews

Science Fiction Super Pack #1: A generally above-average anthology

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Science Fiction Super Pack #1 edited by Warren Lapine

Like the companion fantasy volume, Science Fiction Super Pack #1, edited by Warren Lapine, only has one story I didn't think was good, and it's a piece of Lovecraft fanfiction. H.P. Lovecraft's overwrought prose doesn't do much for me even when Lovecraft himself writes it, and much less so when it's attempted by imitators. And Lovecraft's stories at least have something frightening that happens in them; these two stories (in this volume and the other) only have visions of aspects of the Mythos and crazy people ranting, which isn't scary or interesting. Everything else was good, occasionally even amazing.

Again like the fantasy volume, it more ... Read More