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C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne

(1866–1944)
Born in Bibury, Gloucestershire, but raised in Yorkshire, Charles John Cutcliffe Wright Hyne attended Cambridge University, where he received both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. Best remembered today for his The Lost Continent, he was also extremely popular at one time for his fanciful tales of Captain Kettle, a dashing Raffles of the Sea. Besides these he wrote historical novels, travelogues, political commentary and an autobiography, totaling roughly fifty novels and a large number of short stories. Hyne died on 10 March 1944, at the age of seventy-eight.
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The Lost Continent: Possibly the finest novel of Atlantis ever written

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The Lost Continent by C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne

The Lost Continent first appeared serially in the English publication Pearson's Magazine in 1899, and in book form the following year. The author, C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, is not exactly a household name today, but, way back when, was an extremely popular and prolific writer. His serialized tales of Captain Kettle, also in Pearson's, were supposedly only second in popularity to the Strand Magazine's Sherlock Holmes stories, as submitted by Arthur Conan Doyle. But today, Hyne's reputation seems to rest solely on this wonderful novel of the last years of the continent of Atlantis.

The history of these final years is told by the soldier-priest Deucalion, who, at the book's opening, has just been recalled from his 20-year viceroyalty of the Atlantean province of Yucatan. On hi... Read More