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Scott Hawkins

(1969- )
Scott Hawkins grew up in South Carolina and graduated from the University of South Carolina with a B.S.C.S. in computer science in 1991 and an M.S. in 1993. Since then he has worked a variety of computer jobs, usually having something to do with Unix / Linux, though there have been occasional forays into Windows development. He lives in the Atlanta suburbs with his wife and a lot of dogs. For fun he reads audiobooks and watches movies. He also enjoys cooking and woodwork. The Library at Mount Char is his first published fiction.
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The Library at Mount Char: Science and magic intertwine in this phenomenal debut

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The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

Ever wonder what might happen if a god went missing? The Library at Mount Char is Scott Hawkins’ fiction debut, and in my personal opinion, it is flawless. There are no wasted words, no unnecessary plot digressions, no moments in which a character says, “Wow, this crisis is important! We should respond right away!” and then tootles off to fold laundry for ten paragraphs. Each detail is crucial, even if the reader doesn’t realize it for a hundred pages or more, and the resulting novel feels enormous and expansive though the page count doesn’t hit 400.

Garrison Oaks was a lovely little slice of Virginian 1970s suburbia, where Adam Black roasted meats in an enormous metal bull and shared beer with his neighbors. Things changed, though, in one cataclysmic afternoon. Black revealed himself to be something far more ... Read More

Jana Chats with Scott Hawkins

Today Scott Hawkins stops by Fantasy Literature to talk shop. We discuss writing, language, literary influences, and summer cocktails. One lucky U.S.-based commenter will win a copy of Hawkins’ debut novel, The Library at Mount Char, which I absolutely loved.

Jana Nyman: What drew you from computer sciences to writing fiction?

Scott Hawkins: It was the other way around. I more or less always wanted to be a writer, at least from the time I was twelve or so, but I knew the odds of success weren’t good. I hoped I’d have whatever it took to keep going, and the luck to get published eventually, but I didn’t think it was smart to bet on it. In a lot of Read More