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H. Warner Munn

H. Warner Munn(1903-1981)
Harold Warner Munn was an American writer of fantasy, horror and poetry. He was an early friend and associate of authors H. P. Lovecraft and Seabury Quinn. He has been described by fellow author and Seattle resident Jessica Amanda Salmonson, who interviewed him during 1978, as “the ultimate gentleman” and “a gentle, calm, warm, and good friend.” He was known for his intricate plotting and the careful research that did for his stories, a habit he traced back to two mistakes made when he wrote his early story “The City of Spiders.” In addition to writing, Munn collected books and classic pulp magazines, including Air Wonder Stories, Amazing Stories, Astounding and other science fiction titles, along with Argosy, Argosy All Story, Cavalier, Weird Tales to the end of the Wright publication series, and others.

Merlin’s Godson

Merlin’s Godson — (1966) Publisher: An outstanding fantasy epic of Arthurian romance and adventure in the lands beyond the world’s edge.

Merlin's Ring by H. Warner MunnMerlin's Ring by H. Warner Munn

Merlin’s Ring: Historical fantasy with a strong dose of romance and optimism

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Merlin’s Ring by H. Warner Munn

H. Warner Munn’s Merlin’s Ring is one of the odder fantasies I have come across in my reading, but also one for which I have a deep affection. The book is equal parts pseudo-Arthurian Romance (in both the medieval and modern sense of the word), era-spanning historical fantasy à la Edwin Arnold’s Phra the Phoenician, and epic hero’s journey; there is even some mild pulp sci-fi thrown in for good measure. Despite (or maybe because of) all of this melding and mixing, Merlin’s Ring manages to be something all its own.

Written by one of the old standbys of the Weird Tales pulp magazine (Munn was an associate of H.P. Lovecraft and Seabury Quinn) Merlin’s Ring was probably Munn’s masterwork. It is actually the second v... Read More

Weird Tales: 32 Unearthed Terrors

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Weird Tales: 32 Unearthed Terrors edited by Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin Greenberg

Though hardly a runaway success in its day, and a publication that faced financial hardships for much of its existence, the pulp magazine known as Weird Tales is today remembered by fans and collectors alike as one of the most influential and prestigious. Anthologies without number have used stories from its pages, and the roster of authors who got their start therein reads like a "Who's Who" of 20th century horror and fantasy literature. During its 32-year run, from 1923-1954, and in its 279 issues, Weird Tales catered to a select readership that could not help but be impressed by early efforts from the likes of Robert E. Howard, Read More