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Jean-Christophe Valtat

Kingsley Amis(1968- )
Jean-Christophe Valtat is a French writer and teacher. He is the author of the novel Aurorarama (2010), published by Melville House, as well as two novels, Exes, and 03, which famous literary critic James Wood (critic) picked as one of the best books of 2010, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and a book of short stories, Album. He has also written the award-winning radio play La vie inimitable and a movie Augustine (2003), which he also co-directed. He was educated at Ecole Normale Superieure and the Sorbonne. He is Assistant Professor in Comparative Literature in the Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, France where he researches Romantic, modern and contemporary literature and the relationships between literature, science, technology and the media.

The Mysteries of New Venice

The Mysteries of New Venice — (2012-2013) Publisher: Introducing the Mysteries of New Venice steampunk trilogy with a first volume that “entrances and delights” (NPR). In the defense of steampunk comes a literary adventure unlike anything you’ve read before. 1908, New Venice: An ominous black airship hovers in the sky, and the city is hunting for the author of a radical pamphlet calling for revolt. The lead suspect is Brentford Orsini, one of the city’s most prominent figures. As the net around him tightens, Orsini receives a mysterious message from a long-lost love that compels him to act. Brilliant in its conception, masterful in its prose, thrilling in its plot twists, and laced with humor, suspense, and intelligence, Aurorarama marks the beginning of a great new series of books.

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Aurorarama: This glittering Tesla-punk 19th century novel pastiche actually works

Readers’ average rating:

Aurorarama by Jean-Christophe Valtat

Other reviewers on Fanlit will probably be surprised by the number of stars I’ve given this book, because they’ve had to read my kvetching about it for several Status Updates. I finally finished it, and to my surprise, I think in Aurorarama, Valtat succeeded in his Tesla-punk 19th century adventure novel pastiche.

It is early in the 20th century, and New Venice is a city in the Arctic, powered by Tesla-like machines, filled with art, music, entertainment, drugs, censorship, science and magic. The city was founded by the Seven Dreamers, who rest in cryogenic tubes in some undisclosed location. Currently, the Council of Seven governs New Venice, and it is policed by the Gentlemen of the Night. The Council is trying to gain control of the city’s greenhouse, and drive out the native people, the Inuit, while the Gentlemen of the Night wage a reign ... Read More