Next Author: Allison Brennan
Previous Author: Patricia Bray

Chaz Brenchley

Chaz Brenchley(1959- )
Chaz Brenchley
mainly writes horror and crime thrillers. He also writes fantasy under the pseudonym Daniel Fox. Read excerpts and learn about his other books at Chaz Brenchley’s website.

Chaz Brenchley also writes under the pseudonyms Daniel Fox and Ben Macallan.

Moshui, the Books of Stone and Water

Moshui, the Books of Stone and Water — (2009-2011) Publisher: The island of Taishu may be a remote outpost of empire, but it is also the only source for true jade, which is far more than a symbol of imperial power. Rebellion has driven the young emperor from his capital; eventually, inevitably, he leads his defeated army to Taishu, a last stand for a lost cause. Crossing the strait, he encounters a fisher-girl and claims her for himself, brief comfort for a lonely and frightened boy. There are known to be pirates in the strait, drawn by the lure of jade-ships, fabulous wealth. There is said to be a dragon under the water, chained there long ages since. A pirate crew slays the monks who supposedly keep the dragon quiescent; at the same time they free a slave, who howls when his chains are cut. And takes possession of a cabin-boy, puts him in chains, cuts curious signs in the iron… That boy has seen the dragon once already; now he feels her stirring. In his mind.

Daniel Fox Moshui, The Books of Stone and Water 1. Dragon in Chains. 2. Jade Man's Skin 3. Hidden CitiesDaniel Fox Moshui, The Books of Stone and Water 1. Dragon in Chains. 2. Jade Man's Skin 3. Hidden CitiesDaniel Fox Moshui, The Books of Stone and Water 1. Dragon in Chains. 2. Jade Man's Skin 3. Hidden Cities

Dragon in Chains: An uncommon fantasy setting

Readers’ average rating:

Dragon in Chains by Daniel Fox

Most epic fantasy written in English has its basis in Western culture. While the worlds created in these books are not our world, they are generally recognizable: the use of language is comfortable, the foods are what we or our ancestors ate, the customs are basically familiar. Even mythological creatures look the way we expect them to, so that unicorns have horns and dragons have wings. When there are exceptions to these rules, the author is certain to provide an explanation, and the exception is often integral to the tale.

In recent years, however, the Far East has begun to appear in fantasy more and more often. Daniel Abraham’s LONG PRICE QUARTET, for instance, is set in a vaguely Far Eastern milieu. Read More

Jade Man’s Skin: Not as enjoyable as first book

Readers’ average rating:

Jade Man’s Skin by Daniel Fox

Why are the second books of trilogies so difficult? Jade Man’s Skin is the second book of MOSHUI: THE BOOKS OF STONE AND WATER, a series set in an alternate China where dragons are real and jade has the power to make an emperor nearly invincible. I greatly enjoyed Dragon in Chains, the first in this series. And I can’t say that I didn’t enjoy Jade Man’s Skin; only that I enjoyed it less. It seems to start somewhere and end somewhere, but there is a great deal of chatter in between.

In the second book in Daniel Fox’s trilogy, the dragon inhabiting the strait between the mainland of the empire (which is clearly China, though it is not given a name) and Taishu (which appears to be Taiwan in our world) has been mostly unchained, but is not ... Read More

Hidden Cities: Final volume lacks closure

Readers’ average rating:

Hidden Cities by Daniel Fox

PLOT SUMMARY: Whatever they thought, this was always where they were going: to the belly of the dragon, or the belly of the sea.

More by chance than good judgment, the young emperor has won his first battle. The rebels have retreated from the coastal city of Santung — but they’ll be back. Distracted by his pregnant concubine, the emperor sends a distrusted aide, Ping Wen, to govern Santung in his place. There, the treacherous general will discover the healer Tien, who is obsessed with a library of sacred mage texts and the secrets concealed within — secrets upon which, Ping Wen quickly realizes, the fate of the whole war may turn.

As all sides of this seething conflict prepare for more butchery, a miner of magical jade, himself invulnerable, desperately tries to save his beautiful and yet brutally scarred clan cousin; a priestess ... Read More

Magazine Monday: Subterranean Magazine, Spring 2014

Readers’ average rating:

The Spring 2014 issue of Subterranean Magazine is as strong as this magazine ever is, and that’s saying a lot. Kat Howard’s story, “Hath No Fury,” stands out as a memorable work about the old gods in the modern age. It is a story about women who are victimized by men, and the women who refuse to allow those victims to go unavenged. Based loosely on the myth of Medea and Jason, the story is told in the first person by one of the Erinyes — the Furies — who in Howard’s contemporary New York are charged with avenging women murdered by husbands, boyfriends, lovers. Kaira is a close friend of Medea, who is a sort of muse to the Erinyes, guiding them when they first are changed from human to this new shape and watching over them as they fulfill their duties. Several other myths are mashed up here to create something new; so, for instance, Medea keeps bees, the Fates are old women knitting in the park, New York beco... Read More

More Speculative Fiction by Chaz Brenchley

Outremer — (1997-2003) Publisher: The desert kingdom of Outremer is ruled by a harsh king whose will is enforced by warrior-priests called Ransomers. But when a young Ransomer in training meets the daughter of the King’s Shadow, the reign of blood and magic will be changed forever.

Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Outremer 1. The Devil in the Dust 2. Tower of the King's Daughter 3. A Dark Way to Glory 4. Feast of the King's Shadow 5. Hand of the King's Evil 6. The End of All Roads


Selling Water by the River — (2006-2007) Publisher: For a thousand years, the great city of Sund stood impregnable while its enemy, Maras, remained outside the walls. Then the Marasi harnessed the powers of magic. Erecting an otherworldly bridge whose foundations were rooted in sorcery, the Marasi overran the walls of Sund, and threw them down. In the city of Maras-Sund, magic has been outlawed. Yet there are children being born with raw magical talent-and there are those who would rally behind them to rebel against their hated overlords. Issel, a young water-seller from the poorest part of the city, possesses the gift for magic. And when he is recognized for his talents, recruited, and trained in the arts, his abilities may hold the key to his people’s salvation.

Chaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Selling Water by the River 1. Bridge of Dreams 2. River of the WorldChaz Brenchley fantasy book reviews Selling Water by the River 1. Bridge of Dreams 2. River of the World


Keys to D’Esperance — (2012) Publisher: Chaz Brenchley’s chilling new haunted house series — War widow Ruth Taylor arrives at RAF Morwood, the great house formerly known as D’Esperance, hoping that nursing badly wounded airmen will distract her from her sorrows. But almost as soon as she enters the house, she experiences strange visions and fainting spells, and the almost overwhelming sensation of her late husband’s ghostly presence. For D’Esperance is a place of shadows and secrets — and as the strange occurrences become increasingly menacing and violent, Ruth is forced to confront a terrible possibility: that her dead husband might be the cause…

fantasy and science fiction book reviewsfantasy and science fiction book reviews


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsfantasy and science fiction book reviews

Paradise — (1994) Publisher: They call it Paradise — an inner-city danger-zone, starved of resources, starved of hope; run-down housing, run-down lives. Then, a miracle happened. A dying boy was healed by the touch of a charismatic young man. And that’s only the beginning. Richard brings light into the darkest places.


Dispossession — (1996) Publisher: Jonathan wakes up in hospital and is told he has been involved in a car crash. He doesn’t remember the last three months, and the doctors say he’s only been there three days. He also doesn’t remember the woman by his bedside who says she is his wife, but she has the pictures that seem to prove it.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsShelter — (1999) Publisher: Rowan Coffey is 19 when one of his friends is murdered. Rowan, who had no alibi and was under suspicion, has been knocked off-balance by the experience and leaves university seeking the comfort and familiarity of his home. But his home is under threat.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsRotten Row — (1999) Publisher: A novella. Rotten Row is the worst place we’ve made. Humankind can travel to the stars — but only if you’re sure of yourself. Content to be flung as a datastream through space, flitting from male to female, dark to fair, tall to short to broad, one random discard body to the next. Those who go are the Upshot, rare individuals subject to their own rigid laws. And then there’s Rotten Row. Outcast from the Upshot community, in breach of all codes, in Rotten Row people design their own bodies and sell them on for re-use after. Outlandish bodies: furred and feathered, winged and hooved and worse. duLaine is an artist, but all art is about identity; where one blurs into the other beyond physical limits and legal restraint, what is art worth and how can anyone be certain who they are? duLaine travels to Rotten Row in search of answers, and finds himself snared by passions, plots and betrayals beyond his worst imaginings, far beyond his ability to control.


CLICK HERE FOR MORE TITLES BY CHAZ BRENCHLEY.

 


Speculative fiction by Ben Macallan (Chaz Brenchley, Daniel Fox)

Desdaemona — (2011-2012) Publisher: Jordan helps kids on the run find their way back home. He’s good at that. He should be — he’s a runaway himself. Sometimes he helps the kids in other, stranger ways. He looks like a regular teenager, but he’s not. He acts like he’s not exactly human, but he is. He treads the line between mundane reality and the world of the supernatural, including the awesome Powers That Be. Desdaemona also knows the non-human world far too well. She tracks Jordan down and enlists his aid in searching for her lost sister Fay, who did a Very Bad Thing involving an immortal. This may be a mistake — for both of them. Too many people are interested now, and some of them are not people at all! Ben Macallan’s urban fantasy debut takes you on a terrifying journey, lifting the curtain on what really walks our city streets.

Ben Macallan DesdaemonaBen Macallan Desdaemona 2. Pandaemonium


FanLit Asks: July 24, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:
Got any personal news to share?
Chaz Brenchley: Hee. Ordinarily I spend my time trying to persuade people that the actual physical day-to-day life of a writer is the dullest thing imaginable (“I sit at a desk and drive a keyboard; I’ve been doing it thirty-five years; my cats lead much more interesting lives than I do; may I tell you about my cats?”) -- but as it happens, I do have personal news. I got married, and moved five thousand miles to a whole new continent. Where the sun shines. A lot. I have ripening chillies in the garden! (And the cats’ lives are still more interesting than mine, or will be once we let them outside...) So, yeah. Newcastle novelist moves to California and gets married, shock horror. My friends are still reeling. So am I... In other news: my ... Read More

FanLit Asks: August 28, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:
Got any personal news to share?
Ian Tregillis: This is shaping up to be a busy summer for me. In June, I submitted my fourth novel (Something More Than Night) to Tor.  In July, my first novel (Bitter Seeds) debuted in the UK, and a week later my second novel (The Coldest War) came out here in the US. And I just finished reviewing the copyedits for my third novel (Necessary Evil). I'm attending two conventions in August. Bubonicon in Albuquerque (yes, New Mexico's local convention is named after the bubonic plague!) and Worldcon in Chicago.



Read More

FanLit Asks: September 4, 2012

Some of your favorite authors take some time to answer our questions:
What are you working on these days?
Taylor Anderson: Well, I'm hard at work on the next DESTROYERMEN novel already, and as usual, I'm enjoying that a lot. If people get half as much fun out of reading my books as I get out of writing them, I figure I'm way ahead. Otherwise, I've been coordinating with the US Veteran's Museum in Granbury, TX., trying to put together some really interesting activities.

Elizabeth Hand: I'm working on Wylding Hall, a contemporary gothic YA novel that riffs on Daphne DuMaurier's Rebecca.

Nancy Holzner Read More