Next Author: Jim C. Hines
Previous Author: Will Hill

Sharon Hinck

Sharon HinckSharon Hinck writes Christian fantasy.
CLICK HERE FOR MORE BOOKS BY SHARON HINCK.

The Sword of Lyric

The Sword of Lyric — (2007-2008) Publisher: Susan Mitchell needed a change — any kind of change. Nearly twenty years of marriage to her college sweetheart, Mark, had given her two teenagers and two grade-schoolers, along with miles of unmatched socks, sticky countertops, and the ever-growing hum of sheer bedlam. When had she become so… insignificant? Hadn’t God once had a plan for her? Well, at least Mark had a plan: for an attic hideaway free of iPods and science projects and cookie crumbs. But before Susan can finish her first journal entry, she finds herself pulled through a portal into a world grappling for its soul and waiting for a promised Restorer. Someone does have a plan for her — one she never would have imagined. While she struggles to adapt to a foreign culture full of unfamiliar technologies and taboos, she faces unexpected battles, mind-poisoning enemies, and a profound spiritual journey. Her adventure will forever change her family, her faith, and how she experiences love — from the One.

Sharon Hinck The Sword of Lyric Christian fantasy 1. The Restorer 2. The Restorers Son 3. The Restorers JourneySharon Hinck The Sword of Lyric Christian fantasy 1. The Restorer 2. The Restorers Son 3. The Restorers JourneySharon Hinck The Sword of Lyric Christian fantasy 1. The Restorer 2. The Restorers Son 3. The Restorers Journey

The Restorer: Christian fantasy

Readers’ average rating:

The Restorer by Sharon Hinck

When reading fantasy books, I generally apply two arbitrary criteria that I have found useful in determining books I like. The first is I look for the willingness of the author to kill important characters — not secondary or briefly mentioned characters. I've always felt that to do so was brave and showed a willingness to push the story's limits rather than following a predictable course. The second is actually from Aristotle’s Poetics. Summarized, Aristotle says the primary character must be believable. In essence, the character must be more human than superhuman. No one wants to read about the perfect man doing great things (i.e. early Superman). No, the reader prefers the character to suffer and overcome those sufferings (whether external or internal), thus creating a true hero (i.e. Batman or Spider-man).

The Re... Read More