Next Author: Betty Brock
Previous Author: Kristen Britain

Maurice Broaddus

Maurice BroaddusMaurice Broaddus graduated in 1993 from Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis and holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Biology (with an undeclared major in English). He works as an environmental toxicologist. Read more about him at Maurice Broaddus’s website.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE BOOKS BY MAURICE BROADDUS

Knights of Breton Court

Knights of Breton Court — (2010-2011) Publisher: From the drug gangs of downtown Indianapolis, the one true king will arise. The King Arthur myth gets dramatically retold through the eyes of street hustler King, as he tries to unite the crack dealers, gangbangers and the monsters lurking within them to do the right thing. Broaddus’ debut is a stunning, edgy work, genuinely unlike anything you’ve ever read.

Maurice Broaddus Knights of Breton Court 1. King Maker 2. King's Justicefantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews

King Maker: Read by a white girl in the UK

Readers’ average rating:

King Maker by Maurice Broaddus

The premise of King Maker is simply awesome, and I wanted to love the book based on that alone. I’m a big fan of the King Arthur mythology, and the idea of such a unique slant on the story had me extremely excited. I found myself bewildered, however, as I worked my way through the book.

I want to deal with the strengths of the novel first. Maurice Broaddus’ writing creates a dangerous and authentic mood. The language is fierce and evokes the gritty realism of life on the streets. When the supernatural elements are introduced, they drift through the novel like smoke, leaving the reader gradually horrified as the end game is reached. Broaddus’ horror background is evident; some of the events in King Maker sent chills down my spine.

With all that said, I didn’t enjoy Read More

Magazine Monday: Asimov’s, February 2014

Readers’ average rating:

The first of three novelettes in the February 2014 issue of Asimov’s is Derek Künsken's “Schools of Clay,” a space opera that is almost incomprehensible. It concerns a race of beings that is modeled on bees, apparently, with queens, workers and new generations of princesses. These beings mine asteroid belts and seem to be partly machine and partly organic (though their nature is never spelled out, one of the serious shortcomings of this story). Some of these beings have souls, and some do not, though what “soul” means in this context is unclear. Diviya is the viewpoint character, a medic or mechanic or both, caught between castes. And he is a revolutionary, for the workers have become dissatisfied with their status. A need for the colony to migrate — a pod of predatory shaghāl has come after the colony, beings whose nature and aims are not explained — comes too early for the plans of the revolutionaries,... Read More