World Wide Wednesday

World Wide Wednesday is hosted by Marion Deeds. On most Wednesdays, Marion will take you around the internet, letting you in on some interesting news from the SFF community. If you’ve got a tidbit to share, please comment on the latest post, or contact Marion.

WWWednesday; June 21, 2017

The name for the sound a quail makes is called curkling. That’s this week’s word for Wednesday.

Radiance (c) Likhain



Solstice:

Solstice occurred at 04:24 UTC, and June 21st will be the longest day of the year. Don’t forget sunblock. 

Awards:

Com... Read More

WWWednesday; June 14, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is the noun aquatile. An aquatile is a creature that lives in water. I’m guessing it can also be used as an adjective. Can one have “an aquatile lifestyle?”

Books and Writing:

Likhain is an artist, currently on the shortlist for a Hugo in 2017. File 770 printed the Artist Guest of Honor speech she gave at Continuum 13.

The New York Times has a story about Books of Wonder, a famed children’s bookstore, that is opening a second location as a contingency against a possible lease hike in 2019.

Foul language in the headline, Read More

WWWednesday; May 31, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is the adjective rattatattatory, which means “consisting of repeated sounds or tapping,” as in, “the fireworks exploded in a rattatattatory burst.” This word should win an award for carrying onomatopoeia to absurd lengths. Thanks once again to Haggard Hawks.

Awards:

Charles Stross was awarded the Alberto Lisiero award, given to those who contribute to the popularity and quality of science fiction writing.

Penthesilea, Queen of the Amazons



Tooting Our Own Horn:

Bill’s review of Read More

WWWednesday: May 24, 2017

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the people of Manchester, Greater Manchester, England.



There is still time to donate to JustGiving who is raising money for families affected by the horrible attack at a concert in Manchester, Greater Manchester,England, Monday night. Here is a link.

Zora ONeill shares ten English words that make more sense when you know their Arabic roots.
Stranger Than Fiction:

It’s just awkward when real-life news outstrips the imagination and weirdness of a dedicated speculative fiction/fantasy/horror writer and reader like myself, like it did last week. The real world insisted on delive... Read More

WWWednesday; May 17, 2017

On Sunday, in honor of Mother’s Day, Syfy Wire posted a list of the best moms from Star Trek. 

Awards:

Locus has published the finalists for the Locus Awards, which will be awarded at the Locus Weekend, June 23-25, 2017, in Seattle, Washington. Locus has more categories so more winners: best SF novel, best fantasy novel, best horror novel and best first novel as an example. Some of our favorites made the lists, including Malka Older’s Infomocracy in the Best First Novel category, Read More

WWednesday; May 10,2017

Poster for 2017's Forum Fantastico in Lisbon, Portugal. Thanks to File770



This week’s word for Wednesday, courtesy once again of Haggard Hawks, aganippe (noun) is a source of inspiration or power.

Awards:

Colson Whitehead’s brilliant novel The Underground Railroad won him the Pulitzer Prize. You can reread Bill’s  5-star review here.

Books and Writing:

Robert Jackson Bennett Read More

WWWednesday; May 3, 2017

Awards:

John Langan’s novel The Fisherman won the Bram Stoker award for superior achievement in a novel. Haven, by Tom Deady won for best first novel, and that guy has the perfect last name for a horror writer. See all the winners here.

Books and Writing:


George R.R. Martin says his first published work was a fan letter he wrote to Marvel Comics when he was fourteen years old.  Here, as part of the History Channel’s Superheroes Decoded, he reads it aloud. My favorite... Read More

WWWednesday: April 26, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is the noun footstitch, which means a single footstep.

Award Winning Pub sign displays three varieties of Vulcan.



Awards:

The Hugo ballot has changed in the area of Best Fan Artist, when Alex Garner reported that his published 2016 work was professional art not fan art. Stephen Stiles is now on the ballot.

File770 also keeps track of the impact of the influence of the Rabid Puppies. They have updated their post here to allow for this new information. It’s clear that the RPs have trouble identifying eligible works.

The Hugo ballot packets are available. I got mine on Sunday.

Locus Read More

WWWednesday; April 19, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is a noun, zounderkite, which you may have heard if you watched Penny Dreadful. It means a person who does very stupid things; “Chester, you zounderkite, I said ‘Don’t push the big red button!’” The word is believed to be Germanic in origin and was popular in Victorian times. It looks like it would be a good Scrabble word.

Rain Puddles on Mendocino Headlands



Awards:

Courtesy of File 770, here are the winners of the British Science Fiction Awards. The winner for Best Novel was Europe in Winter by David Hutchinson.

The finalists for the Eugie Foster Award for short fiction were announced and include work from Alyssa Wong, Read More

WWWednesday; April 5, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is the noun blether-head, which means a noisy fool. I think you can make it a modifier too, as in “blether-headed nonsense,” which might be redundant.

Awards:

The 2017 Hugo Awards shortlist is out. I am disappointed by one terrible oversight; City of Blades by Robert Jackson Bennett is not on the short list for novel. That is a crime. Otherwise, I think it’s a good list.



Here are the finalists for Best Novel:

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor) Read More

WWWednesday: March 29, 2017

Today’s word for Wednesday is the noun poltroon, meaning coward. Its origins appear to be Middle French and/or Middle Italian. It may be descended from a Middle French world for a foal or a baby animal (implying frailty and skittishness?) It first appeared about 1520. It is not to be confused to pontoon, which is a floating structure or part of a seaplane.

Awards:

This is from February: Charlie Jane Anders won the Crawford Award at this year’s International Conference for the Fantastical in the Arts (ICFA), for All the Birds in the Sky.

City of Miracles by Robert Jackson Bennett



New Releases:

Here are some books we’re excited ... Read More

WWWednesday; March 22, 2017

According to Haggard Hawks, the same way a flock of crows is called a murder, the poetic term for a group of salamanders is a maelstrom. And you can find many more cool collective nouns for animal groups here.

Awards:

This year’s Tiptree Award went to Anna-Marie McLemore for When the Moon was Ours.

Independent horror publisher Word Horde had a very good day at the This is Horror awards. John Langan’s The Fisherman Read More

WWednesday; March 8, 2017

Happy International Women's Day.

This week’s word for Wednesday is panchreston, a noun that can mean an answer so vague, generalized and all-encompassing it provides no answer at all, or a panacea, something meant to “cure all ills.”

Books and Writing:

Today Tor.com is providing a collection of short fiction based on the theme “Nevertheless she persisted.” Politics-watchers, feminists and people on Twitter will recognize the now-famous words applied to Senator Elizabeth Warren. Thanks to Terry Weyna.

Unbound Worlds Cage Match 2017



Unbound Worlds has opened its annual Cage Match, a bracket contest featuring science fiction versus fantasy characters. Writer... Read More

WWWednesday; March 1, 2017

Awards:

The Bram Stoker short list is announced. I am jazzed to see that John Langan’s The Fisherman is on there, but as usual there are several fine books in the mix.

In case you missed the Academy Awards, here is this list of winners. Moonlight took Best Picture, even if another film literally walked off with their Oscar.

Cat. (c) 2017 by Tracy J. Butler



The Hugo nominations close at midnight March 17, 2017. You must be a WorldCon member, either full or associate, to nominate. If, like me, yo... Read More

WWednesday; February 22, 2017

Word for Wednesday. In The Accidental Dictionary, Paul Anthony Jones informs us that “naughty” used to mean “nothing.” It was a contraction of ne and aught, meaning “not anything.” In the 1400s the word began to take on an interpretation of “morally nothing,” and the word was used to mean bad or evil. By the Tudor era it specifically meant licentious or sexually inappropriate before gradually declining to have the  “misbehaving” meaning it generally has today.

Awards:

Robert J Sawyer won the Robert Heinlein Award for his novel Quantum Night. http://www.bsfs.org/bsfsheinlein.htm

This year’s Skylark Award, given to a person who “has contributed signifi... Read More

WWWednesday; February 15, 2017

Obituary:

Although Edward C Bryant is not well-known these days, he was a definite influence on the genre. Locus has his obituary. His short works were frequently on the Hugo and Nebula shortlist. In 2011, Ted Chiang wrote about what he learned from Bryant’s short story collection Particle Theory for Strange Horizons.

Edward C Bryant approaches the podium on his signature roller skates.



This is a personal memorial for me because my memories of Bryant are braided up with memories of a week-long writing workshop I took in the 1980s. He was one of the instructors. His humor, his honesty and his encouragement have stayed with me... Read More

WWWednesday; February 8, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is a noun, xenodochium. It means is a hostel or guest-house, or anywhere where strangers are made welcome.

Books and Writing

Lake Powell and the Grand Escalante from the International Space Station.



Sarah Beth Durst posted a little bit about the sequel to The Queen of Blood on her spiffy redesigned website. http://www.sarahbethdurst.com/ReluctantQueen.htm

Atlas Obscura introduces us to Marie Duval, a 19th century animator who was overlooked by history.  Thanks to File 770.

Read More

WWWednesday: February 1, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday, again courtesy of Haggard Hawks, is kalokagathia, a noun of Greek origin that means goodness of character. I have to say, it doesn’t roll off the tongue. 

Conventions:

Lunar New Year Celebration, Year of the Rooster, in Singapore



Charles Stross announced on his blog that he will not be coming to FenCon in Texas in September, because, in light of the recent Executive Order signed by President Trump, Stross feels that more and harsher restrictions will be coming and that he belongs to groups that could be targeted; nor does he want to be seen to endorse the type of behavior the EO demonstrates. He is announcing it now to give F... Read More

WWWednesday; January 25, 2017

This week’s word for Wednesday is a verb; to slounge. It is old Scots and means to hang about in the hope of getting some food. It can also be a noun, someone who is slounging can be called “a slounge.” Now I have a word for the squirrels in my backyard. 

Books and Writing:

This article from Quartz looks at the prolific Isaac Asimov, who, it states, wrote 500 books in his lifetime, and tries to tease out writing lessons for all of us. Thanks to Ryan for this one.

Tor.com has this nice interview with Lois McMaster Bujold.

Locus Magazine Read More

WWWednesday; January 18, 2017

I don’t read Wil Wheaton’s blog very often, but the other day I did, and I found this. Philomena Cunk is too wonderful not to share.



Awards:

Yikes! Only two days left on this one; the James White Award is still open for entries, and winner are published in Interzone. The award is open to not-yet-professional writers and the word length is 6,000 words.

The winners of the Stabby Awards for 2017 were announced, and Pierce Brown won for best novel with Morningstar.

Books and Writing:

 

Friendly Robots



Winter is coming, maybe, someday. Read More

WWWednesday; January 11, 2017

Pampered Cat



Today’s word for Wednesday is pamperdom, a noun, (rare, archaic) for a state of luxury or a state of being pampered. Kind of obvious, I know, but kind of cute. In modern times, the use of this word is probably most frequently applied to cats.

Contests and Awards:

The Baen Fantasy Adventure contest opens on January 15, 2017, and will remain open until April 1, 2017. The limit for original fantasy adventure is 8,000 words. The winner gets their work published on the Baen website and a Baen shopping spree; second and third place get Baen shopping sprees plus bragging rights. The winners will be announced at GenCon in August of this year. Why not go for it?

Robert Stack provides a tabl... Read More

WWWednesday; December 28, 2016

This is not the usual column. After the loss of Carrie Fisher yesterday at the age of 60, I thought we needed something uplifting that gives us comfort and hope. I am providing a link to the Vanity Fair obituary for our princess, because it contains Carrie Fisher's signature humor.

I know for many younger readers Princess Leia was prologue. For me (I'm the same age she was) she was a role model. And as Carrie Fisher courageously shared parts of her life, even the not-so-good parts, with the world, Fisher herself became a role model for me, a model of how to be a funny, brave, honest woman.

I'll stop talking now.

This is what I wanted to share, courtesy of NASA. The camera is mounted on the European Space Agency's Module Columbus. I think this is quite long, but it provides a perspective. If possible, watch i... Read More

WWWednesday; December 21, 2016

Today’s word for Wednesday is myriagon, a noun, meaning a shape with 10,000 sides.

Tree and aurora borealis



Holiday Break:

I hope your winter holidays are filled with love, joy and magic for you and your families. The column will take a two-week break after today and be back on January 11, 2017.

Books and Writing:

Penguin Random House has terminated its collective bargaining agreement with two unions in the UK, fueling fears of layoff (the British term is “redundancy”). Penguin Random House is severing its relationship with these unions after a year where it saw 23% growth in profits. This is a scary sign for the US, especially in the upcoming political environment. Read More

WWWednesday; December 14, 2016

Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones) and Cassian Andor (Diego Luna) get ready to lead a mission.



Only two more days until Rogue One; a Star Wars Story opens nationwide.

Giveaway: 

I will announce the winner of the Giveaway from last week’s column on Sunday, December 18, in the comments section of that column. Thanks to everyone for your suggestions! 

Awards:

You can vote here for the best digital comic of 2016. Thanks to File 770 for the link.

Stephen King thinks it’s just fine that Bob Dylan got the Nobel Priz... Read More

WWWednesday; December 7, 2016

Today’s word for Wednesday is the noun flummadiddle, which means something worthless or foolish, a bauble. It used to be the name of a bread-and-pork-fat based pudding with sweet spices like cinnamon and allspice (that doesn’t sound worthless). It might come from the word “flummery,” also a kind of dessert, which is believed to be of Welsh origin.

You will see this word again later in the column. 

Dreamer of Dreams by Edmund DuLac



Gift Recommendations and Giveaway:

I’m always amazed and impressed by the knowledge base of our readers, so I’m turning part of the column over to you today. Since it’s that time of year, please go to the comments and tell us all your best gift-book recommendation. If you are a writer, it might be your own book (if indie published, please provide the purchase details.) It does not have to have come out ... Read More