More speculative fiction from Catherine Asaro

Sunrise Alley — (2004-2006) Publisher: She was running from a ruthless criminal accompanied by someone more than human…When the shipwrecked stranger washed up, nearly drowned, on the beach near research scientist Samantha Brytons home, she was unaware that he was something more than human: an experiment conducted by Charon, a notorious criminal and practitioner of illegal robotics and android research. The man said his name was Turner Pascalbut Pascal was dead, killed in a car wreck. Then she found that Charon was experimenting with copying the minds of humans into android brains, implanted in human bodies to escape detection, planning to make his own army of slaves that will follow his orders without question. Samantha and Turner quickly found themselves on the run across the country, pursued by the most ruthless criminal of the twenty-first century. In desperation, Samantha decided to seek help from Sunrise Alley, an underground organization of AIs that had gone rogue. But these cybernetic outlaws were rumored to have their own hidden agenda, not necessarily congruent with humanitys welfare, and Samantha feared that her only hope would prove forlorn…

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fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Veiled Web — (1999) Publisher: Winner of the Homer Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. Ballerina Lucia del Mar has two great passions: dance, which consumes most of her waking hours, and the World Wide Web, which brings the outside world into her tightly regimented life. Lucia’s two passions collide when a White House performance and reception leads to an encounter with handsome Moroccan businessman Rashid al-Jazari, creator of a brilliant technology that has set the Internet rumor mill afire. A second, seemingly chance meeting with Rashid will plunge Lucia into a deadly world of desire and intrigue. For although his work has implications she cannot foresee, there are those who do understand and would turn its great power to their own destructive purposes. As she is drawn deeper and deeper into Rashid’s life and work, cut off from the outside world, she finds herself becoming more attracted to him. But is her seclusion within Rashid’s well-guarded Moroccan home intended to ensure her safety… or her silence? And is it already too late to stop the terrible consequences his new technology could unleash?


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Phoenix Code — (2000) Publisher: Deadly awakening. When robotics expert Megan O’Flannery is offered the chance to direct MindSim’s cutting-edge program to develop a self-aware android, it’s the opportunity of a lifetime. But the project is trouble plagued — the third prototype “killed” itself, and the RS-4 is unstable. Megan will descend into MindSim’s underground research lab in the Nevada desert, where she will be the sole human in contact with the RS-4, dubbed Aris. Programmed as part of a top-secret defense project, the awakening Aris quickly proves to be deviously resourceful and basically uncontrollable. When Megan enlists the help of Raj Sundaram, the quirky, internationally renowned robotics genius, the android develops a jealous hostility toward Raj — and a fixation on Megan. But soon she comes to realize that Raj may be an even greater danger — and that her life may depend on the choice she makes between the man she wants to trust and the android she created.


fantasy and science fiction book reviewsThe Spacetime Pool — (2012) Publisher: Three works from Catherine Asaro, author of the Skolian Empire series. Includes Nebula award-winning novella “The Spacetime Pool”, novelette “Light and Shadow”, and an essay: “A Poetry of Angles and Dreams”.

 

 


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