Sunday Status Update: January 29, 2012

It’s hard to believe we’re already almost into February.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Bill:This week I read the newest installment in the MALAZAN universe — Ian Cameron Esslemont’s Orb, Sceptre, Throne. I found it to be Esslemont’s best work yet, though it had some minor flaws and one possible large one depending on the reader. I also read Michael Ondaatje’s The Cat’s Table, a quietly lovely novel with an adult looking back on the trip he took aboard an ocean liner as he left his native Sri Lanka for England. I highly recommend it — not much “happens,” but it’s the sure, wonderful voice that effortlessly carries you along.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Greg: I’m still on Harlan’s World; trying to keep up with the Takeshi Kovacs in Richard K. Morgan‘s Woken Furies. I hope this isn’t the last KOVACS novel cause I’ll miss the S.O.B. Back here on Earth, in the real world, it’s a big day in the Hersom household, at least for one 6-year-old girl; her school’s Father-Daughter Dance is tonight. (The things the fathers must go through for their little princesses.)

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Kat: This past week I finished K.W. Jeter’s Infernal Devices and Aces High, the second WILD CARDS anthology edited by George R.R. Martin. Both of these books were light and easy reading with lots of action. I also read A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke, which was an intense thriller about a space bus being buried in a lake of dust on the moon. Next I’m moving on to Orson Scott Card’s award-winning Speaker for the Dead, the sequel to Ender’s Game. Everything lately is audio, by the way.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Kelly: As I write this, I’m mulling my review of Dark Victory by Michele Lang. Overall, I’d say it didn’t start quite as strongly as Lady Lazarus but ended stronger. And I’m still reading Kari Sperring‘s Living with Ghosts and deeply enjoying it. The characters have a complex tangle of interrelationships, and Sperring takes her time unfolding them for the reader so we don’t get confused. Now, with all of that background carefully built, we’re starting to see just how much trouble the city of Merafi is in. I’m also reading Marjorie M. Liu‘s The Mortal Bone and starting Forbidden by Syrie James and her son, Ryan.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Marion: I’m reading a British thriller by John Macken, called Breaking Point. I’m not very happy with it. Has anyone else read this writer? The idea is kind of interesting but the novel reads like it wants to be a British TV series.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Terry: My reading was concentrated on one book that grabbed me and wouldn’t let me go this week: Gary McMahon‘s The Concrete Grove. It’s a darned scary horror novel that seems to have no mercy on anyone. It’s well-written and well-plotted, and kept me up at night. I also started Genevieve Valentine‘s Mechanique when I learned that the novel had won its author the Crawford Award, which will be formally awarded at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, Florida in March. I’m going, and even presenting a paper, so I’m hoping to meet Ms. Valentine in person — and maybe have her sign my book. I also made some progress on The Cloud Roads by Martha Wells, which has some wonderfully alien (or are they fantastical rather than science fictional?) creatures. Finally, I’m reading the first two issues of the Laird-Barron-edited magazine Phantasmagorium, on which I will have more to say Monday.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Tim: This week, I spent much time and sweat in preparing for a presentation of some work I’ve done on George MacDonald‘s Phantastes. When able, I worked on a review of Anne Rice‘s Interview with the Vampire and once in a while read a bit of Neil Gaiman‘s The Graveyard Book. Being the massive Gaiman fan that I am, I had already read the text, but one of my peers has been looking into it in relation to research on trends in children’s literature and I was interested to look at her points for myself.


SHARE:  Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail  FOLLOW:  Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrsstumblr

TIM SCHEIDLER, who’s been with us since June 2011, holds a Master’s Degree in Popular Literature from Trinity College Dublin. Tim enjoys many authors, but particularly loves J.R.R. Tolkien, Robin Hobb, George R.R. Martin, Neil Gaiman, and Susanna Clarke. When he’s not reading, Tim enjoys traveling, playing music, writing in any shape or form, and pretending he’s an athlete.

View all posts by

2 comments

  1. [Editor: Bill’s update added to column on 1/30/12]

    as usual, ran late on the status report . . . This week I read the newest installment in the Malazan universe–Ian Cameron Esslemont’s Orb, Sceptre, Throne. I found it to be Esslemont’s best work yet, though it had some minor flaws and one possible large one depending on the reader. I also read Michael Ondaatje’s The Cat’s Table, a quietly lovely novel with an adult looking back on the trip he took aboard an ocean liner as he left his native Sri Lanka for England. I highly recommend it–not much “happens,” but it’s the sure, wonderful voice effortlessly carries you along.

    some impressive academics going on in this group btw . . .

  2. I agree, Bill. We’ve got the best kind of geekiness going on here. I love it.

Review this book and/or Leave a comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Add your own review

Rating