The Stormcaller: Time and effort required, but strikes a primal chord

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviewsfantasy book review Tom Lloyd Stormcaller Twilight Reign 1The Stormcaller by Tom Lloyd

The Land is a world where Gods rule supreme. The time of the prophecies has come and old rebellions against the gods have resurfaced, including conflicts with nature itself. The tribes of man, and other species, must scramble and conspire to be on the winning side. Into this dark time, a white-eye (a god-created superhuman) named Isak has ascended and he may be mankind’s last hope or final doom.

For a relatively small page-count, there are way too many characters to keep up with. I realize that many were only introduced to play a bigger role in the following books but I’m afraid I’ll probably forget them by then. At times, the endless parade reminded me of being on a conference call with people I’ve never meant in person — some of the names never even register while some others, if I ever do meet them, turn out to be nothing like the image I had in my head. Also, this is definitely a story that you have to devote some real time and effort to. It took me twice as long to read as most good books of the same size, and I still felt like I was missing something. I’m well read, especially in fantasy, so if I don’t get it, I tend to think more fault lies with the author’s writing than my reading.

All that being said, after a few chapters, The Stormcaller did start to grow on me. There is something about this world simply called The Land that struck a primal chord. It’s intriguing to be caught up in this war of gods and man, with an apocalypse looming near, and the key-players are the most alienated of their kind. When Mr. Lloyd’s writing is at its best, there’s a real edgy dark charge to it that makes me look forward to what his work will become with more experience.

Note on the physical book: The cover illustration of the British version better captures the story than the US cover does. While the US cover is skillfully done, at first glance it looks more like a YA book. And the small print on the inside must have also been intended for younger eyes than mine.

Twilight Reign — (2006-2013) Publisher: Isak is a white-eye, feared and despised in equal measure. Trapped in a life of poverty, hated and abused by his father, Isak dreams of escape, but when his chance comes, it isn’t to a place in the army as he’d expected. Instead, the Gods have marked him out as heir-elect to the brooding Lord Bahl, the Lord of the Farlan. Lord Bahl is also a white-eye, a genetic rarity that produces men stronger, more savage and more charismatic than their normal counterparts. Their magnetic charm and brute strength both inspires and oppresses others. Now is the time for revenge, and the forging of empires. With mounting envy and malice, the men who would themselves be king watch Isak, chosen by Gods as flawed as the humans who serve them, as he is shaped and moulded to fulfil the prophecies that are encircling him like scavenger birds. The various factions jostle for the upper hand, and that means violence, but the Gods have been silent for too long and that violence is about to spill over and paint the world the colour of spilled blood and guts and pain and anguish…

Tom Lloyd fantasy book reviews. Twilight Reign: 1. The Stormcaller 2. The Twilight Herald 3. The Grave ThiefTom Lloyd fantasy book reviews. Twilight Reign: 1. The Stormcaller 2. The Twilight Herald 3. The Grave ThiefTom Lloyd fantasy book reviews. Twilight Reign: 1. The Stormcaller 2. The Twilight Herald 3. The Grave Thief 4. The Ragged ManTom Lloyd fantasy book reviews. Twilight Reign: 1. The Stormcaller 2. The Twilight Herald 3. The Grave Thief 4. The Ragged Man 5. The Dusk WatchmanTom Lloyd fantasy book reviews. Twilight Reign: 1. The Stormcaller 2. The Twilight Herald 3. The Grave Thief 4. The Ragged Man 5. The Dusk Watchmanfantasy and science fiction book reviews


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GREG HERSOM’S (on FanLit's staff January 2008 -- September 2012) addiction began with his first Superboy comic at age four. He moved on to the hard-stuff in his early teens after acquiring all of Burroughs’s Tarzan books and the controversial L. Sprague de Camp & Carter edited Conan series. His favorite all time author is Robert E. Howard. Greg also admits that he’s a sucker for a well-illustrated cover — the likes of a Frazetta or a Royo. Greg live with his wife, son, and daughter in a small house owned by a dog and two cats in a Charlotte, NC suburb. He retired from FanLit in Septermber 2012 after 4.5 years of faithful service but he still sends us a review every once in a while.

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