The Last Curtain Call: Fortunately, not the last book

The Last Curtain Call by Juliet Blackwell science fiction and fantasy book and audiobook reviewsThe Last Curtain Call by Juliet Blackwell science fiction and fantasy book and audiobook reviewsThe Last Curtain Call by Juliet Blackwell

It hardly seems necessary to continue to review Juliet Blackwell’s HAUNTED HOME RENOVATION MYSTERIES because fans are going to read them no matter what I say but, since the audiobook publisher keeps providing me with review copies, I’ll keep doing it. I love Tantor Media’s audio editions of Blackwell’s two cozy paranormal mystery series (this one and WITCHCRAFT MYSTERIES) because they’re narrated by the fabulous Xe Sands. They are a pleasure to listen to and I recommend them to fans (or future fans) of Blackwell’s books.

The Last Curtain Call (2020) is the eighth novel. Each is a stand-alone mystery, so you could start here, but you’d miss the progression of Mel’s relationships, so it’s best to start at the beginning with If Walls Could Talk. (Make sure to get the audio edition.) This review won’t have any major spoilers for earlier books.

Each new HAUNTED HOME RENOVATION MYSTERIES novel is another opportunity to spend some more time with Mel Turner and her loveable family and friends, people we’re attached to at this point. We know that we’ll also get to learn something interesting about the history and culture of San Francisco or the surrounding area. And, of course, there’s a murder mystery to be solved (but never enough clues for the reader to solve it).The Last Curtain Call by Juliet Blackwell science fiction and fantasy book and audiobook reviews

This time Mel is renovating an old famous abandoned Art Deco movie theater in San Francisco. This is Turner Construction’s most ambitious project yet and, I think, my favorite one in terms of just the actual renovation. Besides being a difficult job, though, the theater has some additional challenges. It’s not clear who’s financing the project and there may be some hidden agendas and, therefore, obstructions involved. Mel is not the first contractor to attempt to take on the job. Another issue is that the theater is populated by a group of homeless people. The squatters are artists, and it won’t be a fun or politically popular move to expel them. When one of the squatters is murdered, Mel is compelled to solve the crime.

But it’s not all business and murder, of course. In Mel’s personal life, her fiancé is asking about a wedding date. His gift to her is the newly purchased home that Mel grew up in. As they plan the renovation, in an upstairs bedroom Mel discovers some vintage dresses (and guess who she takes one to?) as well as a ghost that may be a murderer and may be connected to the goings-on at the theater.

As I already said, it kind of doesn’t matter what I say about The Last Curtain Call. Fans are going to read it and I can assure them that they’ll be pleased with this instalment. It’s got everything we expect and want from the HAUNTED HOME RENOVATION MYSTERIES series. In this novel, Blackwell also brings our attention to the problem of homelessness in San Francisco.

When I saw that the title of this book was The Last Curtain Call, I thought it sounded like maybe this was the last book in the series, but fortunately that does not appear to be the case. Mel’s story is not finished and I look forward to the next volume.

Published in June 2020. A new ghoulish mystery from the New York Times bestselling author of A Ghostly Light featuring Mel Turner, a ghost-whispering contractor. Mel Turner can’t resist the chance to bring the Crockett Theatre, a decrepit San Francisco Art Deco movie palace, back to life. But there’s a catch for Turner Construction: Several artists are currently squatting in the building, and they aren’t the only ones haunting the once-grand halls of the historic theater… When one of the squatters is found dead, the police department has a long list of suspects to investigate. Meanwhile, Mel and her fiancé, Landon, are remodeling an old house for themselves, and Mel finds being on the other side of a home renovation project more challenging than she expected. When Mel discovers that the former owner of the Crockett Theatre died under mysterious circumstances, and that there just might be a connection to the ghost haunting her own attic, the case takes a new turn—one that could bring down the curtain for the last time.

SHARE:  Facebooktwitterredditpinteresttumblrmail  FOLLOW:  Facebooktwitterrsstumblr
If you plan to buy this book, you can support FanLit by clicking on the book cover above and buying it (and anything else) at Amazon. It costs you nothing extra, but Amazon pays us a small referral fee. Click any book cover or this link. We use this income to keep the site running. It pays for website hosting, postage for giveaways, and bookmarks and t-shirts. Thank you!

KAT HOOPER, who started this site in June 2007, earned a Ph.D. in neuroscience and psychology at Indiana University (Bloomington) and now teaches and conducts brain research at the University of North Florida. When she reads fiction, she wants to encounter new ideas and lots of imagination. She wants to view the world in a different way. She wants to have her mind blown. She loves beautiful language and has no patience for dull prose, vapid romance, or cheesy dialogue. She prefers complex characterization, intriguing plots, and plenty of action. Favorite authors are Jack Vance, Robin Hobb, Kage Baker, William Gibson, Gene Wolfe, Richard Matheson, and C.S. Lewis.

View all posts by

One comment

  1. With the relentless gentrification in SF and the huge homeless problem, this book sounds like Blackwell is tackling current events. I’ll probably pick it up just for the Art Deco theater!

Review this book and/or Leave a comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *