The God Wave: Pushing the limits of human ability

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The God Wave by Patrick Hemstreet science fiction book reviewsThe God Wave by Patrick Hemstreet

It’s said we only use 10 percent of our brains. What does that mean all our untapped brainpower is capable of? Could human ability surpass everything we’ve thought possible until now? This is exactly what Patrick Hemstreet explores in his debut, The God Wave.

Neuroscientist Chuck Brenton has been exploring the ability of brainwaves. He figures it’s possible to harness the power of the brain to perform actual tasks. But it’s not until mathematician Matt Streegman offers Chuck a business proposition that he realises the true extent of his research. With data that Matt has collected, the pair soon have test subjects using their brainwaves to interact with computer software. They quickly progress from being able to move a mouse across a screen, to being able to move physical objects.

The breakthrough has the ability to change humanity as we know it, yet Chuck and Matt differ vastly on their outlooks for the project. Chuck is interested in using his discovery for medicine, deep-sea or space exploration. The much more commercially minded Matt has his sights set on the security or video game industries. With his business acumen, Matt organises the involvement of the rather sinister General Howard, but the military soon take more control over Chuck’s lab than he ever wanted.

The God Peak: A Novel (The God Wave Trilogy) Kindle Edition by Patrick Hemstreet (Author)

sequel

Like The Martian before it, it is the science in The God Wave that makes for such an engrossing and convincing tale. The story feels utterly believable and meticulously researched, whilst not being overbearing; the novel will please hard- and soft-sci-fi fans alike. Hemstreet uses plenty of familiar tropes throughout, and you’ll recognise scenes reminiscent of Alien and Star Trek.

Whilst the pacing was slow to get going, it certainly picks up and the plot really takes off, with some surprises tossed in too. He also poses some thought-provoking questions about science versus creativity, liberality versus security, and considers the ethical repercussions of Chuck’s experiment.

The book is, at its heart, a thriller, and will appeal to readers across genres. The fact that this is Hemstreet’s debut it pretty astounding. With an explosive finale and a cliffhanger ending, The God Wave will leave many readers eagerly awaiting the next instalment.

Publication date: May 17, 2016. A team of neuroscientists uncover amazing new capabilities in the brain that may steer human evolution toward miraculous and deadly frontiers in this spectacular debut work of speculative science fiction—Limitless meets James Rollins—that combines spirituality and science in an inventive, mind-blowing fashion. For decades, scientists have speculated about the untapped potential of the human brain. Now, neuroscientist Chuck Brenton has made an astonishing breakthrough. He has discovered the key—the crucial combination of practice and conditioning—to access the incredible power dormant in ninety percent of our brains. Applying his methods to test subjects, he has stimulated abilities that elevate brain function to seemingly “godlike” levels. These extraordinary abilities can transform the world, replacing fear and suffering with tranquility and stability. But in an age of increasing militarization, corporate exploitation, and explosive technological discovery, a group of influential power brokers are determined to control Brenton’s new superbeings for their own manipulative ends—and their motives may be far from peaceful.

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RACHAEL "RAY" MCKENZIE, with us since December 2014, was weaned onto fantasy from a young age. She grew up watching Studio Ghibli movies and devoured C.S. Lewis’ CHRONICLES OF NARNIA not long after that (it was a great edition as well -- a humongous picture-filled volume). She then moved on to the likes of Pullman’s HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy and adored The Hobbit (this one she had on cassette -- those were the days). A couple of decades on, she is still a firm believer that YA and fantasy for children can be just as relevant and didactic as adult fantasy. Her firm favourites are the British greats: Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams and Neil Gaiman, and she’s recently discovered Ben Aaronovitch too. Her tastes generally lean towards Urban Fantasy but basically anything with compelling characters has her vote.

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4 comments

  1. Okay, this is being really picky, but I’m skeptical of a brain-science book published in 2016 that starts with the idea that we only use 10% of our brains. I think that idea is pretty out-moded. I wouldn’t care except that the MC is a neuroscientist. The rest of it sounds entertaining.

  2. Jim McMahon /

    When I have my degree in neuroscience I’ll register MY opinion…
    Just now finishing “The God Wave.” Really good stuff, I recommend it with 5 stars.

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