Pretender to the Crown: It takes a thief…

Pretender to the Crown by Melissa McShane fantasy book reviewsPretender to the Crown by Melissa McShane fantasy book reviewsPretender to the Crown by Melissa McShane

Pretender to the Crown (2017) follows the adventures of Willow North, a professional thief who’s always been a lone wolf type of personality. Willow has an inherent magical talent for sensing worked metals: she both sees it ― even in total darkness and through walls ― and feels it. It’s a particularly handy talent for a thief, since she can see where metal jewelry is hidden and when guards with swords are approaching. Anyone with a strong magical talent is required by law to study to become a mage or “Ascendant,” but Willow holds such bitter feelings against Ascendants, who are typically arrogant and abusive, that she hides her talent and uses it for burglary instead.

Willow’s life as a thief gets upended when her former fiancé Kerish, who she hasn’t seen for five years, unexpectedly shows up asking for her help: the king of Tremontane has been assassinated by his Ascendant brother Terence Valant, Kerish’s former employer, who is now usurping the crown, in disregard of the fact the Ascendants are legally prohibited from ruling Tremontane. Now the dead king’s eight year old son Felix, the heir to the throne, is in grave danger, hunted by Terence and his armies of soldiers and Ascendants. Kerish has rescued Felix from the palace and now wants to sneak Felix out of Tremontane to his own country of Eskandel, and who better to help Kerish sneak Felix out of the country than his former girlfriend Willow, the thief?

Pretender to the Crown is the first book in the SAGA OF WILLOW NORTH trilogy, which is a prequel series to the CROWN OF TREMONTANE series by Melissa McShane that I’ve enjoyed very much. McShane’s books tend to hit my sweet spot of intelligently written fantasies with a fairly strong romance element. In this new series we jump back a couple of centuries to find out the history of one of the prominent members of the North family, which is ruling Tremontane in the later books. It’s fascinating to see Willow North’s humble beginnings and the twisted path that will lead her to a place she never expected or wanted to go.

SAGA OF WILLOW NORTH

SAGA OF WILLOW NORTH

The characters are well-drawn and complex, though the romance subplot in Pretender to the Crown is frustrating. Willow and Kerish have a deep divide over their views of what type of life they should live, which is understandable, but it turns into one of those relationships where you want to shake some sense into both parties and tell them to just communicate with each other. Felix Valant is a charming boy who elicits your sympathy for the difficult situation he’s in.

McShane takes on a challenge in developing the Escandelic society, where the leading families form polygamous harems, with one prince married to several women. At least to some extent, that’s offset by the fact that it’s a matriarchal society, where the wives make the key political decisions on behalf of their principality. For the most part it felt quite realistic, with Kerish’s family having distinct personalities, issues and concerns relating to their lives, their principality, and the chances that Willow and Kerish are asking them to take.

Pretender to the Crown ends on somewhat of a cliffhanger, so interested readers should plan on reading the entire trilogy. The second book, Guardian of the Crown, has also been published, with the third still pending. This book, and the series thus far, has some slow spots but overall has kept me engaged and interested in what happens next.

Published in September 2017. Willow North is a thief, and despite her secret magical talent for sensing worked metal, she has never wanted to be anything else. But when her former fiancé appears on her doorstep with the eight-year-old King of Tremontane in tow, she is drawn into the political conflict surrounding the boy King’s ascension. His uncle, a powerful Ascendant with the magic of manipulating the elements, murdered the old King and intends to kill young King Felix. Willow intends only to take the boy to safety, but as the days pass, she finds herself increasingly attached to Felix and unwilling to leave him once he’s safe. But the pretender to the Crown has a long reach, and as his men close in on the fugitives, it seems nowhere may be safe enough.

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TADIANA JONES, on our staff since July 2015, is an intellectual property lawyer with a BA in English. She inherited her love of classic and hard SF from her father and her love of fantasy and fairy tales from her mother. She lives with her husband and four children in a small town near the mountains in Utah. Tadiana juggles her career, her family, and her love for reading, travel and art, only occasionally dropping balls. She likes complex and layered stories and characters with hidden depths. Favorite authors include Lois McMaster Bujold, Brandon Sanderson, Robin McKinley, Connie Willis, Isaac Asimov, Larry Niven, Megan Whalen Turner, Patricia McKillip, Mary Stewart, Ilona Andrews, and Susanna Clarke.

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4 comments

  1. Book 3 is due out next week! Book 2 surprised me at the end but not really in a good way. I’m very interested to see how it plays out in the third book and what you think of it.

    • Oh, I have all kinds of thoughts on the ending of book 2! I’ll try to get my review for it written and posted first part of next week and then we can talk more about it. :) I am really interested in seeing how book 3 plays out too.

  2. I know I’ve said this before, but whoever is in charge of the cover design/cover art for McShane’s books is doing a really great job. :)

    • I’ve seen her mention somewhere that she has a good designer who really works with her on the covers. McShane self-publishes this particular series so she has control over the cover art.

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