Little, Big: Narrated by John Crowley

book review John Crowley Little, Bigfantasy book reviews John Crowley Little, BigLittle, Big: or, The Fairies’ Parliament by John Crowley

“Don’t be sad. It’s all so much larger than you think.”

Smoky Barnable lives in the City and thinks of himself as anonymous. His father is dead and his step-siblings have forgotten him. He has no friends at all until he meets George Mouse who introduces him to his strange family. Smoky falls in love with one of George’s cousins, Daily Alice Drinkwater, and he moves upcountry to the Drinkwater estate called Edgewood. At his wedding he meets the Drinkwater family — a clan of eccentric characters who live in or near a huge pentagram-shaped house that Smoky is still getting lost in decades after he moves in (it’s bigger inside than outside). More strangely, the Drinkwaters also have some sort of “religion” that Smoky never quite understands until the end of the story when he realizes that maybe he was not as anonymous as he thought he was. Or maybe he was… And perhaps it’s not really the end of the story, but the beginning instead. Or maybe it really is the end…

During the course of the story, we jump backward and forward in time and meet past and future Drinkwaters, such as John Drinkwater who built the house as a model of five different architectural styles; his wife Violet Bramble who could see fairies; her illegitimate son Auberon who took up photography so he could capture the beings he thought he saw in his peripheral vision; Daily Alice’s sister Sophie, who spends much of her life asleep; Sophie’s illegitimate daughter Lilac who is stolen by the fairies and replaced with a changeling; George Mouse who uses hallucinogenic drugs and doesn’t really care if his bed partners happen to be relatives.

Most of the family’s stories are told in the past tense, after they’ve happened. Thus, there’s not much action or excitement in Little, Big — there’s little exploration of the house or woods or any interaction with the fairies. It’s a slowly meandering family history, somewhat like a soap opera. It’s full of “little” intimate details and doesn’t open up so that we can see the “big” picture until the very end.

Most of the characters are passive; some (mainly the women) believe they are in a fairy tale and are waiting to see how it ends. Those who don’t believe spend their time wondering what they’re not being told, or thinking that the rest of the family is crazy. Nobody talks much about the family’s relationship with faerie because nobody really knows. Is the family being protected? Are the fairies benevolent or malevolent? This aspect of an elusive, plotting, behind-the-scenes race of magical beings reminded me of Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell.

Little, Big has a dreamy, often bleak, fatalistic feel. When bad things happen, such as disappearances, adultery, incest, teenage pregnancy and illegitimate birth, the family says “oh, dear,” forgives each other, and considers it all part of the Story, as if nobody is in control of their own actions. Many readers are sure to be enchanted with the wistfulness, but I did not feel as forgiving toward some of the characters as their family members did, and at one point I got so angry and disillusioned with Smoky that I wanted to give up on him. Not only was I mad at the characters who behaved badly, but I was mad at the rest of them for being so passively philosophical about it all.

What kept me reading this long meandering often depressing story was the magnificence of John Crowley’s prose, which was beautifully read by the author himself in Blackstone Audio’s recent production. Truly, I know few authors who compare and I often found myself sighing with delight at a metaphor or turn of phrase:

While the moon smoothly shifted the shadows from one side of Edgewood to the other, Daily Alice dreamed that she stood in a flower-starred field where on a hill there grew an oak tree and a thorn in deep embrace, their branches intertwined like fingers. Far down the hall, Sophie dreamed that there was a tiny door in her elbow, open a crack, through which the wind blew, blowing on her heart. Dr. Drinkwater dreamed he sat before his typewriter and wrote this: “There is an aged, aged insect who lives in a hole in the ground. One June he puts on his summer straw, and takes his pipe and his staff and his lamp in half his hands, and follows the worm and the root to the stair that leads up to the door into blue summer.” This seemed immensely significant to him, but when he awoke he wouldn’t be able to remember a word of it, try as he might. Mother beside him dreamed her husband wasn’t in his study at all, but with her in the kitchen, where she drew tin cookie-sheets endlessly out of the oven; the baked things on them were brown and round, and when he asked her what they were, she said “Years.”

The audio production of Little, Big was superb and my only complaint is that there is no accompanying family tree like there is in the print version of the book. Fortunately, I was able to find this with the “Look Inside” feature at Amazon.

Little, Big: or, The Fairies’ Parliament was nominated for all the major awards in 1982 and won the World Fantasy Award. Indeed, it’s a remarkable achievement and is one of the most beautifully written books I’ve ever read. Little, Big will not appeal to all readers, and I’m not sure I’ll read Little, Big again, but I will always remember it with awe. Fans of Catherynne M. Valente, Neil Gaiman, and Patricia McKillip will be totally charmed by John Crowley’s writing style and should put Little, Big on the top of their TBR stacks right now.

Little, Big — (1981) Publisher: John Crowley’s masterful Little, Big is the epic story of Smoky Barnable, an anonymous young man who travels by foot from the City to a place called Edgewood — not found on any map — to marry Daily Alice Drinkawater, as was prophesied. It is the story of four generations of a singular family, living in a house that is many houses on the magical border of an otherworld. It is a story of fantastic love and heartrending loss; of impossible things and unshakable destinies; and of the great Tale that envelops us all. It is a wonder.

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KAT HOOPER is a professor at the University of North Florida where she teaches neuroscience, psychology, and research methods courses. She occasionally gets paid to review scientific textbooks, but reviewing speculative fiction is much more fun. Kat lives with her husband and their children in Jacksonville Florida.

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2 comments

  1. I don’t do audio books much, but it Crowley himself read this one, I’m going to have to seek it out. I love this book.

  2. Marion, you can sample it here.

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